Issue 219 May 2009

1 Yapang Marruma: Making Our Way LARISSA BEHRENDT Tracey Moffatt, Up In The Sky # 1, 1997, offset lithograph, 61 x 76cm (image size). Campbelltown Arts Centre Collection, NSW. © Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery.

1 Yapang Marruma: Making Our Way LARISSA BEHRENDT

Tracey Moffatt, Up In The Sky # 1, 1997, offset lithograph, 61 x 76cm (image size). Campbelltown Arts Centre Collection, NSW. © Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery.

2 10 Days, 7 Critics on the Island Writers included: Lucy Wilson Magnus, Stephenie Cahalan, Mark Cutler, Sara Wright, Kylie E. Eastley & Gai Anderson Image: Stephen Bain, Baby, where are the fine things you promised me, 2009. Installation view, Penguin, Tasmania. 

2 10 Days, 7 Critics on the Island

Writers included: Lucy Wilson Magnus, Stephenie Cahalan, Mark Cutler, Sara Wright, Kylie E. Eastley & Gai Anderson

Image: Stephen Bain, Baby, where are the fine things you promised me, 2009. Installation view, Penguin, Tasmania. 

3 Hume with a view: You Am I VIRGINIA FRASER Image: Fatima Killeen, Laparoscopy, 2005, colour collograph, 42 x 54cm. Image courtesy the artist.

3 Hume with a view: You Am I VIRGINIA FRASER

Image: Fatima Killeen, Laparoscopy, 2005, colour collograph, 42 x 54cm. Image courtesy the artist.

4 Islam in Oz JEREMY ECCLES Image: Borderlands, installation view, Casula Powerhouse, December 2008. Photograph by Phillip George.

4 Islam in Oz JEREMY ECCLES

Image: Borderlands, installation view, Casula Powerhouse, December 2008. Photograph by Phillip George.

5 The Moment After: Lynette Wallworth’s Duality of Light JEMIMA KEMP Image:  Lynette Wallworth, Duality of Light, 2009, multimedia installation, Samstag Museum of Art.

5 The Moment After: Lynette Wallworth’s Duality of Light JEMIMA KEMP

Image:  Lynette Wallworth, Duality of Light, 2009, multimedia installation, Samstag Museum of Art.

6 Bromley in Alice CHRIS RAJA Image: David Bromley, Man’s best friend, 1999, acrylic on linen, 101 x 101cm;

6 Bromley in Alice CHRIS RAJA

Image: David Bromley, Man’s best friend, 1999, acrylic on linen, 101 x 101cm;

7 Love thy neighbour: SLOT five years on AUTHORS: GINA FAIRLEY, MERILYN FAIRSKYE, RUARK LEWIS, MAI LONG & TONY TWIGG Image: Installing Ruark Lewis’s, Banalities for Babel (detail), 2005, installation view, 2009, at Gas N Go service station, Redfern. This text-panel reads: 8 he disappeared in thin air 9 across the citys [sic] frozen water he could hear the voices 10 where the folded ribbons remain a warning 11 a snake is mostly misunderstood 12 in their music the sound of water is almost audible 13 he was stationed in the army of the senses 14 why gather momentum 15 the rat has solved the problem of the hole. Image courtesy the artists and SLOT.

7 Love thy neighbour: SLOT five years on

AUTHORS: GINA FAIRLEY, MERILYN FAIRSKYE, RUARK LEWIS, MAI LONG & TONY TWIGG

Image: Installing Ruark Lewis’s, Banalities for Babel (detail), 2005, installation view, 2009, at Gas N Go service station, Redfern. This text-panel reads: 8 he disappeared in thin air 9 across the citys [sic] frozen water he could hear the voices 10 where the folded ribbons remain a warning 11 a snake is mostly misunderstood 12 in their music the sound of water is almost audible 13 he was stationed in the army of the senses 14 why gather momentum 15 the rat has solved the problem of the hole. Image courtesy the artists and SLOT.

8 Negotiating art and its public: Optimism at the GOMA: NICHOLAS THOMPSON Image: Tom Moore, Getting the truck out of there, 2008, hot joined, blown and solid glass with steel and silicon, 10 x 49 x 14cm. Courtesy the artist, JamFactory, Adelaide, and Ray Hughes Gallery, Sydney.

8 Negotiating art and its public: Optimism at the GOMA: NICHOLAS THOMPSON

Image: Tom Moore, Getting the truck out of there, 2008, hot joined, blown and solid glass with steel and silicon, 10 x 49 x 14cm. Courtesy the artist, JamFactory, Adelaide, and Ray Hughes Gallery, Sydney.

9 Not Strictly for the Birds: The Art of Jan Brown ROBERT DINGLEY Image: Jan Brown, Bird in hand, 2006-07, ciment fondu, 10 x 13 x 9cm.

9 Not Strictly for the Birds: The Art of Jan Brown ROBERT DINGLEY

Image: Jan Brown, Bird in hand, 2006-07, ciment fondu, 10 x 13 x 9cm.

10 Sir Walter Baldwin Spencer: Portrait of a Collector SHIREEN HUDA Image: George Lambert, Sir Walter Baldwin Spencer 1917, 1921, oil on canvas, 91.4 x 71.1cm. Image courtesy Museum of Victoria, Melbourne, presented by Lady Spencer in 1929.

10 Sir Walter Baldwin Spencer: Portrait of a Collector SHIREEN HUDA

Image: George Lambert, Sir Walter Baldwin Spencer 1917, 1921, oil on canvas, 91.4 x 71.1cm. Image courtesy Museum of Victoria, Melbourne, presented by Lady Spencer in 1929.

11 Letter: Model printmaking     Letter printed in full: Dear Editor While I was very pleased to see the focus on the Ta Teut Amarasi – Awakening (Northern Territory, West Timor) printmaking project in AMA # 218 April 2009, and the very nice comparison with Aboriginal prints, I was sorry the context for it was missing, not only for understanding the wider ramifications of such a project but because of the link to Indigenous cultural experience which underlay it. When Asialink and The Ford Foundation in Jakarta initiated the program, of which this was one outcome, three years ago, the Aboriginal experience of building an international market was the role model: building understanding of international cultural practice, particularly in marketing quality products for specific audiences, increasing capacity to work with such practices, and – a longer-term benefit – increasing pride in and strength of local cultural activity. We looked for projects that would act as pilots for further development in this direction.  The sale of high-quality, high-priced artworks from Aboriginal Australia was the example for people of Eastern Indonesia, in this case West Timor, to raise rather than lower (the current pressure) the quality and depth of their cultural products. From the Amarasi project, beautiful though these initial prints are, we see the next step being to build the size and scope of their output, and so increase the supply, sales and income from these wonderful images.  The Ford Foundation has been a great supporter of the pilot projects, but they have had a change of focus – from arts more to ‘media’ – so they cannot continue funding them. It would be great if another agency, with a community-capacity-building focus, could step in, and enable both this community to build on this first experience, and other communities to follow suit. Yours, Alison Carroll Director, Asialink Arts

11 Letter: Model printmaking

 

 

Letter printed in full:

Dear Editor

While I was very pleased to see the focus on the Ta Teut Amarasi – Awakening (Northern Territory, West Timor) printmaking project in AMA # 218 April 2009, and the very nice comparison with Aboriginal prints, I was sorry the context for it was missing, not only for understanding the wider ramifications of such a project but because of the link to Indigenous cultural experience which underlay it.

When Asialink and The Ford Foundation in Jakarta initiated the program, of which this was one outcome, three years ago, the Aboriginal experience of building an international market was the role model: building understanding of international cultural practice, particularly in marketing quality products for specific audiences, increasing capacity to work with such practices, and – a longer-term benefit – increasing pride in and strength of local cultural activity. We looked for projects that would act as pilots for further development in this direction. 

The sale of high-quality, high-priced artworks from Aboriginal Australia was the example for people of Eastern Indonesia, in this case West Timor, to raise rather than lower (the current pressure) the quality and depth of their cultural products. From the Amarasi project, beautiful though these initial prints are, we see the next step being to build the size and scope of their output, and so increase the supply, sales and income from these wonderful images. 

The Ford Foundation has been a great supporter of the pilot projects, but they have had a change of focus – from arts more to ‘media’ – so they cannot continue funding them. It would be great if another agency, with a community-capacity-building focus, could step in, and enable both this community to build on this first experience, and other communities to follow suit.

Yours,
Alison Carroll
Director, Asialink Arts

12 Protocols for working with children in art SERENA ARMSTRONG & SUZANNE DERRY Image: Concetta Petrillo, Censored I, 1996, from original silver gelatin print (51 x 51cm) and reprinted on transparent film (2003), 120 x 120cm. This image cannot be shown uncensored without infringing the protocols, unless it has first been given an unrestricted classification by the Australian Classification Board. Art Monthly has blacked out the boys’ genitals so that the photo no longer depicts a naked child. This would create a moral rights infringement if the artist did not consent to the censorship. Parental consent was obtained, confirmation the artist complied with applicable laws was obtained. Image courtesy the artist.

12 Protocols for working with children in art SERENA ARMSTRONG & SUZANNE DERRY

Image: Concetta Petrillo, Censored I, 1996, from original silver gelatin print (51 x 51cm) and reprinted on transparent film (2003), 120 x 120cm. This image cannot be shown uncensored without infringing the protocols, unless it has first been given an unrestricted classification by the Australian Classification Board. Art Monthly has blacked out the boys’ genitals so that the photo no longer depicts a naked child. This would create a moral rights infringement if the artist did not consent to the censorship. Parental consent was obtained, confirmation the artist complied with applicable laws was obtained. Image courtesy the artist.