Issue 179 May 2005

1. Cultural malling in Manila: The new Ayala Museum bridges culture and consumerism by GINA FAIRLEY Ayala Museum at night. Courtesy of the Ayala Museum, Manila.

1. Cultural malling in Manila: The new Ayala Museum bridges culture and consumerism by GINA FAIRLEY

Ayala Museum at night. Courtesy of the Ayala Museum, Manila.

2. Recollections on the art and life of Margaret Preston, Thea Proctor and Grace Cossington Smith: A personal memoir by MARY TURNER Thea Proctor, Lady with fan, 1913, pencil, watercolour wash on cream wove paper. Purchased 1919. Collection of the Art Gallery of NSW. is on at the National Portrait Gallery, Old Parliament House, Parkes until 19 June.

2. Recollections on the art and life of Margaret Preston, Thea Proctor and Grace Cossington Smith: A personal memoir by MARY TURNER

Thea Proctor, Lady with fan, 1913, pencil, watercolour wash on cream wove paper. Purchased 1919. Collection of the Art Gallery of NSW. is on at the National Portrait Gallery, Old Parliament House, Parkes until 19 June.

3. Videoperformance: Tony Schwensen in Sydney by CHRISTOPHER CHAPMAN Tony Schwensen, High school shuffle (stills from video), 2003, video transferred to DVD, c 62 minutes, exhibited as projection. Courtesy of the artist and Performance Space, Sydney.

3. Videoperformance: Tony Schwensen in Sydney by CHRISTOPHER CHAPMAN

Tony Schwensen, High school shuffle (stills from video), 2003, video transferred to DVD, c 62 minutes, exhibited as projection. Courtesy of the artist and Performance Space, Sydney.

4. Terry Smith’s dilemma: Modern or Contemporary? by BERNARD SMITH Exterior view of MoMA, designed by Yoshio Taniguchi. Photo Timothy Hursley, 2005. Courtesy of MoMA.

4. Terry Smith’s dilemma: Modern or Contemporary? by BERNARD SMITH

Exterior view of MoMA, designed by Yoshio Taniguchi. Photo Timothy Hursley, 2005. Courtesy of MoMA.

5. Geoglyphs: An ancient art form reinvented by KEN SCARLETT Andrew Rogers, Ancient language, 2003, volcanic rock, clay and bird droppings, 2.8 x 80 x 36 metres, Atacama Desert, Chile.  

5. Geoglyphs: An ancient art form reinvented by KEN SCARLETT

Andrew Rogers, Ancient language, 2003, volcanic rock, clay and bird droppings, 2.8 x 80 x 36 metres, Atacama Desert, Chile.
 

6. The art of Fiona Hall in Brisbane by TIMOTHY MORRELL Fiona Hall, Tender (detail), 2003-05, US dollars. Courtesy of the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney. Photo Clayton Glen.

6. The art of Fiona Hall in Brisbane by TIMOTHY MORRELL

Fiona Hall, Tender (detail), 2003-05, US dollars. Courtesy of the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney. Photo Clayton Glen.

7. Fire and fear in the Australian landscape:Fireworks in Mackay, Queensland by SALLY BUTLER Eugène von Guérard, Bushfire between Mount Elephant and Timboon, 1857, 1859, oil on canvas mounted on board. Collection of the Ballarat Fine Art Gallery, gift of Lady Currie in memory of her husband the late Sir Alan Currie, 1948.

7. Fire and fear in the Australian landscape:Fireworks in Mackay, Queensland by SALLY BUTLER

Eugène von Guérard, Bushfire between Mount Elephant and Timboon, 1857, 1859, oil on canvas mounted on board. Collection of the Ballarat Fine Art Gallery, gift of Lady Currie in memory of her husband the late Sir Alan Currie, 1948.

8. Ten Days on the Island 2005: The exhibition round-up by DANIEL THOMAS Lucia Usmiani, Clatter (detail), 2005, installation of plastic bottles and bamboo stakes on Goldie Street, Wynyard. In the exhibition HWY1 #2, at various locations on the Bass Highway, Tasmania, from 1 to 10 April. Photo Richard Muir-Wilson.

8. Ten Days on the Island 2005: The exhibition round-up by DANIEL THOMAS

Lucia Usmiani, Clatter (detail), 2005, installation of plastic bottles and bamboo stakes on Goldie Street, Wynyard. In the exhibition HWY1 #2, at various locations on the Bass Highway, Tasmania, from 1 to 10 April. Photo Richard Muir-Wilson.

9. Death, desire and dolls in Darwin by SUZANNE SPUINNER   Topsy, courtesy of Brenda Croft. ‘Topsy was given to me by my mother when I was a little girl. It was her dolly when she was a little girl and she handed it on to me. Although my mother’s heritage is Anglo-Australian of Irish, German, English background, being married to an Aboriginal man she wanted to make sure I had a strong sense of cultural identity and so I had black dolls when I was a child even though they were ‘mammy dolls’ based on African-American dolls.’  

9. Death, desire and dolls in Darwin by SUZANNE SPUINNER
 

Topsy, courtesy of Brenda Croft. ‘Topsy was given to me by my mother when I was a little girl. It was her dolly when she was a little girl and she handed it on to me. Although my mother’s heritage is Anglo-Australian of Irish, German, English background, being married to an Aboriginal man she wanted to make sure I had a strong sense of cultural identity and so I had black dolls when I was a child even though they were ‘mammy dolls’ based on African-American dolls.’